Alex Bono: Syracuse University Goalie Who Strives For More

Syracuse University men's soccer player Alex Bono made a new record on a Sep. 16 game

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Alex Bono is always focusing on the game. Photo by Jiayang Zhang

Zhehao Zhou

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I am a graduate student majoring in Magazine Newspaper Online Journalism in SU. I enjoy meeting and talking to different people. I am also a fan of sports and music.

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If you read the bio of Alex Bono, junior goalie of Syracuse University men’s soccer team, you might be surprised by the number of awards he has. After a game on Tuesday, Sept. 16, one more award was added to his collection. The Baldwinsville native claimed the sole possession of the second most shutouts of goalkeepers in the university’s history, surpassing Robert Cavicchia who played at SU in 2005-2008.

Perhaps none of this would happen if it were not for an injury of Bono’s goalie teammate when he was 10 years old. Bono, a forward of his team at the time, volunteered to be the keeper; the rest is history.

Being the last defender is always stressful, but Bono loved the pressure.

Bono plays a huge role in defense.

Bono has contributed a lot to the soccer team’s shutouts. Photo by Jiayang Zhang.

“When something goes wrong, people look to me to fix it,” he said. “I think it is pretty cool. A forward can miss the goal 10 times, and he scores a goal, he becomes a hero. I can make 10 saves, and I give up a bad goal and I am the zero.”

Having played soccer for 15 years, Bono formed his own philosophy and positive attitude.

“I am perfectly good with that,” he said.

At 6-foot-3, Bono not only excels in sports, but his talents extend beyond the field. Bono is a Broadcast and Digital Journalism major at Syracuse University’s prestigious S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. His major might explain the level of comfort he projects and the quality of quotes he gives during soccer-related interviews.

Bono has his own way of balancing work and soccer. He said those methods include late nights, homework on the road and plane reading.

”Getting a degree is so important nowadays,” Bono said. “I cannot imagine myself trying to succeed without having one.”

On his way back home on Tuesday after the game, Bono thanked everyone who congratulated him, including Cavicchia — who flew all the way from Canada hoping to witness the moment. In Bono and Cavicchia’s friendly interaction, Bono seemed to deal with the achievement quite peacefully. However, other records needed to be broken, Bono said.

“We have never made a Final Four. We have never made the ACC championship and NCAA championship,” he said.